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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
as an m.a. i worked as an advisor to the israeli administration to the u.n. arafat speaking for the general assembly. very tumultuous period. i moved to israel and tried for this unit in the army. the tryouts are rather rigorous. i did 17 months of basic training. and got out just prior to the lebanon war. but in israel, we have -- you serve for a long period your regular serve and do reserve service to the age of 52. now i have a son in the army who is 19. and in a very elite unit. i am still doing reserve duty. we share uniforms. very bizarre. >> how old are you now? >> i'm 47. >> you can be called up at any time? >> i have been. i served in the latest intifada. in a combat role. >> where? >> in nablus. >> full combat uniform? >> i'm supposed to be semiretired. you stop jumping in the israeli army in the paratroopers at age 37 and cease being a combat soldier at age 42. at 42, 43, i was asked to stay on as an advisor on media relations. why not? sounds interesting. get good briefings. when the fighting broke out in the west bank, they asked any of the media advisors if the
strong action through the u.n. security council. the head of the japanese affairs bureau spoke by phone with the u.s. special representative on north korea, glen daveys and south korea's chief negotiator. they agreed that the launch clearly violates u.n. security council resolutions that ban north korea from launching any rockets using ballistic missile technology. japanese ambassador to the u.n. said he has asked the security council to take up the issue. the council has decided to hold an emergency meeting on wednesday. the world has been focusing on one of north korea's few allies in asia. nhk world's takafumi reports from beijing on china's response. >> reporter: chinese foreign minister spokesperson condemned the launch in a routine news conference. >> translator: it's regrettable that north korea went ahead with the launch despite the international community's close attention. as a member of the united nations, the north has the obligation to respect security council resolutions. >> reporter: but the chinese official expressed a kosher stance toward additional sanctions against th
it. they were pretty clear today they were not about to start supporting u.n. sanctions against the north, but we have a new leadership here, and there are signs he may be less indulgent of north korea, less indulgent of a nation which officials here privately have likened to a spoiled child. so it may well be we'd see a different tone in relationships with china, and, of course, this may be crucial going forward in terms of what can be done and indeed what can be done to prevent another nuclear test, which has been hinted at by pyongyang, andrea. >> thank you so much, ian williams in beijing tonight. >>> joining me now is michigan congressman mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, also a former fbi agent. thanks for being with us. what is the significance and what do we know about the success of this, because there had been prior attempts, all failures, but this one seems to have worked. >> it seems to have worked according to plan and maybe worked beyond what we expected and maybe even what the north koreans expected. this puts them clearly on a path, you k
both. >> reporter: after the u.n. security council disbanded without announcing any punishment, the white house and state department signaled intention to outsource the job to the north korea patron state china. >> i think you saw the chinese make clore their opposition to this launch, prior to it and the regret over the fact it took place after it happened. >> we are very much ready to engage with our colleagues on the council. we will be searching for a clear and credible response. >> kim jung un is expected to capitalize on the boost of the internal standing that the launch provided to move to conduct another nuclear test. five years ago, then senator obama vowed for diplomacy with dictators like kim. >> would you be willing to meet with the leaders of iran, syria, venezuela, cuba, north korea? to bring the gap the divides our countries. >> i would. the reason is this. the notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them, which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration is ridiculous. >> yet, it was under the bush administration that t
economic power. >> there no tangible signs of improvement. the u.n. program said 16 million north koreans or nearly 70% of the population suffer from malnutrition. north korea's relations with the outside world are at a stand still. last february the united states agreed to provide food aid in exchange for being free of the ballistic missile tests. the deal was welcome after the north tested a missile. north korea's leadership has been trying to hold talks with the united states, but officials in washington said they are not ready to accept. china is also applying pressure on its neighbor. arguing that the missile launch could violate u.n. resolutions. nhk world. >> the professor is an expert on the korean peninsula. i spoke with him to get more insight into the korean missile launch. i started with asking him the intention of north korea. >> the mostortant thing for pong i don't think is to appeal or to empathize with their own rights or so they said the most independent sovereign ty is the most important point. peaceful use of the nuclear energy and the other is the peaceful use for out
north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is saying. >> they're saying saudi arabia figures saying we produce less. now the i.a. saying they produce more. also interesting, they're saying in iran, iranian production edging lower under the weight of shipping constraints have stepped up. we heard it was up. go figure the oil markets and production levels. a murky world. opec ministers are arriving as we speak for the annual meeting. the 12-member group wide
to put a satellite into orbit. right now the u.n. security council is meeting behind closed doors to discuss a response. in the meantime a lot of talk happening in d.c. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon with more on this. so far, what is the reaction? >> reporter: we heard from u.s. officials, they are calling this very highly provocative act. it has been a swift response. we have a statement from national security council spokesman tommy vitter. he said, quote, this action is yet another example of north korea's pattern of irresponsible behavior. the united states remains vigilant in the face of north korean provocations and fully committed to the security of our allies in the region, devoting scarce resources to the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons has not brought north korea security and skaept tans by the international community and never will. jenna, as you mentioned the u.n. security council is meeting as we speak behind closed doors. the north koreans have very little to fear in terms of serious sanctions as a resu
that the north is testing a ballistic missile technology and violating u.n. resolutions and further destablizing the korean peninsula. so many hot spots in the world today to watch as we welcome you on this friday morning to a brand new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer welcome to you at home. good morning to you, again, martha. we're watching the second launch attempt since kim jong-un took over after his father's death a year ago. the last try failed. here is the head of the u.s. pacific command keeping a watch on this. >> we're approaching once again a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution and we encourage and the leadership in north korea to consider what they're doing here and the implications on the overall security environment own the careen peninsula as well as in asia. martha: molly henneberg is live. north koreans may have run into a snag with this launch plan which may be biding some time. what can you tell us about it? >> reporter: martha, a weather snag. snow may have slowed north korea's efforts to put the missile together
that from happening? >> i think what the united states and others are going to do is go to the u.n. security council and try to lengthen the list of sanctions against north korea. it is the most sanctioned country in the world, but the real question is is there anything you can do beyond that? they are still able to cross the threshold, and even if it is a few years before they could put a nuclearized warhead on a missile, there is nothing we are doing now that is impeding the process, and whether it is a few years from now or a year from now, it is coming, and we do not have an answer for it. >> how concerned are you buy what we are looking at at the moment? >> i think if you step back from the specifics of the launch, we have to realize we are now in a situation where you have a small, isolated country that is the first country outside of china and the soviet union to demonstrate long-range ballistic missile technology, and it is a country that has a horrible proliferation record. this is not just a problem associated with north korean on the peninsula. it has broader ramifications. >> tha
to be a clear and credible response. what should that be? >> well, we have a very strong resolution before the u.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hu
is a step, probably an early step, in terms of the developing that capability. jon: well the u.n., the u.s., seoul, said if you launch the missile it will be very provocative act. it could bring on new sanctions. i thought we were sanctioning everything we could in north korea. are we not? >> no, no. again a lot of new techniques have been applied developing new sanctions to iran. one of the methods to apply u.n. and e.u. sanctions of iran was to study the economy of iran. look for have anotherabilities in their financial system and their trade system and that kind of approach has not been applied to north korea very effectively. therefore the sanctions have been rather porous. i would bet north korea buys a lot of things for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear progra
option that by god u.n. after. and here i have to agree with ros. somebody with a big man with a backside if you're president of the united states can achieve a great deal. >> thank you very much. >> thank you all very much. can't knock [inaudible conversations] >> y aerators institute? >> i think the writers institute is something that's very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, a voice says. words are key to our imagination , our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page sensei's of writing, but i think there's no other art form so utterly sensible than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but there is that thing in literature it just captures the human spirit. >> commander of the u.s. military operation in the pacific, admiral samuel locklear spoke with pentagon reporters about north korea's plan to launch a satellite figure this one in violation of two u.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region
: a shocking real-life health crisis involving a former child star, why frankie m u.n. iz was rushed to the hospital. we are live at the breaking news desk. the new nears about chemical weapons in the civil war rocking syria, why the u.s. and the international community should be concerned. we'll go in-depth with ambassador bolton. jenna: right now we are learning about a serious health problem for a former child star, rick folbaum is live at the breaking news news desk with more. >> reporter: you don't usually hear about healthy 20 somethings having strokes. that's what doctors say happened to frankly m u.n. is. he was riding his motorcycle in phoenix when he lost vision in one eye. friends, including his fiancee got worried when he was acting very strangely. turns out he was having a mini stroke. here he is on "good morning america." >> something wasn't right. i knew i did not feel right. coy -pbt say words. couldn't say words. i thought i was saying them. my fiancee was looking at me like i was speaking a foreign language. maybe i had a bad headache, i don't know. i've never had a
missile technology. a senior administration official says the u.s. will wush for a u.n. security council resolution condemning the loss as well as possible sanctions. members began meeting behind closed doors about an hour ago. joining us is former new mexico governor bill richardson. gooz to see you. you're a former u.n. ambassador to the. does it concern you? >> it does concern me. my hope was that the new leader in north korea, kim jong-un, would pick a different path than his father, that he would be more moderate. i think still there's possibilities of dialogue. i'm not sure when. i think he did this for domestic reasons. the last missile launch failed. he only has one year in leadership. he wants to show his people that despite their economic problems, they have military and missile technolo technology, that they're a major power in space, militarilmilita buttress themselves with the north korean military. it was mainly a domestic shot he took, but also he said to the world, you have to deal with me. i'm a major player. >> so it's for domestic audience largely here. should the unit
be african led and that isn't going happen any time soon. the u.n. peace chief said it won't happen until 2013. that may be too far away to make the difference needed. >>> it is been 489 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. a report says businesses added 118,000 private sector ads in november. >>> and now, hillary for president. 66% of all women and even 23% of republicans give another clinton run the nod. now, she say said she isn't doing to run, but her actions may speak louder than those words. maureen dowd notes she has gathering up the suspects, making speeches about israel, solidifying relationships with democrats in washington. tonight, donna brazile and david frum, former speech writer for george w. bush. donna, you know hillary clinton and you know her so well. the poll numbers look pretty stunning, but you know, it's easy to talk about something in the hypothetical, then someone runs and people start finding out all kinds of bad things about you. what do you think? first of all, there are 1,422 days until the next big presidential election. >> who's counting, donna? >
of the dictator kim jung un. >> this is against the u.n. security council resolutions and we are monitoring the situation closely. and working very closely with the self-defense force and the ministry of defense. this is a dangerous situation. and we do not support those actions right now by north korea. bill: steven yates, sir, good morning and welcome back here to america's newsroom. it's been some time since we talked about this issue. now it's back and on the plate. >> any time you are dealing with long range missile capability it will be a concern. we have thousands of troops stationed in japan and korea. there is talk of being able to reach los angeles or the western coast. no north korean test so far has reached that near abroad. bill: what would korea want to prove with this launch? >> always dangerous to try to climb into the mind of a north korean leader. but there would have to be a domestic component to the situation. there are important elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to
violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems th
jong-un took power after his father died nearly a year ago. the u.n. security council is planning to meet tomorrow and the discussion, north korea's controversial launch. our paula hancock is out front tonight in seoul, south korea. what are the officials in seoul saying about what happened? >> reporter: well, we have confirmation from forth korea as far as they are concerned this rocket launch was a success. we had a special broadcast on north korean television just about an hour ago. a very jubilant and excited news reader announced the rocket launch was a success and that the satellite had entered pre-set orbit. north koreans have claimed success in the face of failure in the past. so we have to wait for confirmation. we are waiting on the u.s. and south korean officials working closely to together to see whether or not that satellite is, in fact, in orbit. the south korean response, as you can imagine, is one of condemnation. the blue house which is the korean equivalent of the white house issued a statement, lee myung-bak who was called just after this rocket launch to be inf
north korea north korea. a u.n. report estimates two-thirds of north koreans suffer from chronic food shortage. $100 million, the money spent on the memorials, it-f it was spent on food would have brought enough corn to wipe out north korea's 500 ton food shortfall. most of our talk is about north korea's missiles but tonight's story struck a chord with us showing the greatest wrong done in north korea, aided by other countries, is to north koreans. piers morgan tonight starts now. [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. [ ding! ] losing your chex mix too easily? time to deploy the boring-popcorn decoy bucket. then no one will want to steal the deliciousness. with
. why the senate would vote down a u.n. treaty to support universal rights for the disabled. but they did, 38 senators voted no. some of the so-called facts about the treaty are simply fabrications. ahead on the program, pretty spirited discussion. i interview one of the senators who voted no. senator mike lee. i confront him about those facts. also former u.s. attorney general dick thornburg, a republican, who has a disabled child and still holds out hope the treaty will pass. >>> plus, a legal battle to tell you about over 21-month-old child named talia. her mother gave her up for adoption without the father's knowledge or permission while he was away from home serving in the military. now he wants talia back. the child's fate hinges on a judge's decision. we'll tell you how the why you ruled and speak with talia's dad. those stories and landmark cases making it to the supreme court. it will decide the issue of same sex marriage. all that ahead along with the "ridiculist." >> "360" coming up in ten minutes. >>> our fifth story "outfront" tragedy in london. a nurse at the h
. this hour the u.n. security council is meeting behind closed doors on today's rocket launch. that isn't likely to matter to north korea's new, young leader. kim jong un, who appears to be following in his father's foot accepts even dodged calls on this launch. chris lawrence is following this at the pentagon. chris, if you can tell us a little bit about the launch. it might seem surprising, but was it really surprising given the history we have with these leaders? >> reporter: it was only a surprise, ashley, that it happened last night. they knew this was going to take place, but when north korea asked to extend the launch window to the end of the year, most thought it would come next week at the earliest. i just spoke with a u.s. official who confirms that the object that north korea launched is still in orbit right now, and they're doing their final calculations to determine whether or not it was, indeed, a satellite as north korea claimed. but bottom line, their rocket did go through all three stages, which is a significant jump in technology for them. >> so does this, chris, tell
humanitarian aid and other non- military support. the u.n. now estimates that half a million syrians have fled to neighboring countries with two million more displaced within syria itself. >> ifill: for more on the syrian political opposition i'm joined now by murhaf joujati, professor of middle east studies at the national defense university and a former member of the syrian national council, the last major syrian political opposition group. and fred hof, who served as secretary of state clinton's special adviser for the syrian transition until last september. he is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. ambassador hof, i want to start with you. how significant is what the president said yesterday about this recognition? >> gwen, first of all, i'm delighted to be here. i think what the president had to say was extraordinarily significant. we're coming to the point now where we may be at or very close to a tipping point in syria. where the assad regime may be in serious jeopardy of going down. nevertheless, there are still millions, literally millions, of syrians on the fence. they have
is a provocation against all u.n. resolutions. >> it's a big difference, weaponizing with wmds or nukes. and maybe, victor, just weigh in on that. if there is this suspicion and if it bears any truth, that iran may have actually helped this process along, does that not equate to iran would be willing to help the process along in terms of nuclear warheads as well? >> that's entirely a possibility as well, ashleigh. i think that the relationship between iran and north korea, when it comes to this missile business, has been quite deep, quite robust. every iranian missile of the shahab design, from one through four, have all been north korean missiles. so there's a real history of cooperation there. and i would imagine that it would continue. with regard to whether this thing is a satellite or whatever it is, if the north koreans don't have control of it, that, to me, would not be that surprising, because they really don't have a full-fledged space program. they just disguise this as a space launch, but as the general said, this is clearly for a military application, before it is for a civilian applic
administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to in terms of getting an accurate rocket, in terms of getting heat shielding, and in terms of making a nucle
, they are saying want a moderate and prudent response. may well go to the u.n. security council this morning. back to you. martha: so how important is it for north korea's missile regime, missile program i should say they were able to launch this weapon successfully? they have seen several failures in the past? >> reporter: well it is a major scientific achievement if you look at it on that level even though a lot of their people are starving in the country. from what the experts are saying they're still a long way off from being able to fire a ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead. there is problems with the heat from reentry, things like that. but it's, they are moving towards that ballistic missile which could threaten in the future the u.s. mainland. but it does seem a political success for the new leader, kim jong-un, this young new leader. he pushed for this rocket to be tested and for once it has been successful. back to you. martha: david, thank you very much. we'll have more on that coming up later. bill: certainly will. david mentioned, north korea made several launch attempts in the
with this move. they say it's against the u.n. security council resolutions, it threatens peace on the peninsula and also across the whole world. and that's a response we've really been seeing across this region. now, one rocket expert we did speak to here in seoul did say that he was surprised but said that it was quite impressive that north korea did seem to have mastered this very complicated modular system and also said in theory north korea if this is in fact a success, north korea could now attach a military payload to one of these rockets and it could reach the other side of the world including the united states. >> they knew there was going to be mass condemnation over this. why did north korea launch this rocket now? >> reporter: it's all about timing for pyongyang. the timing was absolutely critical. we are just a few days away from the anniversary of the death of kim jong-il. he died last year december 17th. so kim jong-un, his son in control, wanted to commemorate that, and also 2012 is a very crucial year for north korea. it is the send tenry of the country's founder. the one in apr
foot long u.s. navy ship came n it is it husing vole tears and they also had volunteers on board. >> nearly 200 red cross and fema core volunteers are living in an unconventional place. never in my wildest. it is not only helping people but it is an adventir. >> they are cysting for own a month now. >> fema score vool ears are serving the drs set nupt tri-state area. >> they are coming in the drc right off of the street . they run out of the doredoors. >> volunteers are building relationship with the storm survivors and fellow volunteers. >> it is it always eating together and work together. >> it is not always easy. being around devastation is mentally exhausting. snorks not only do we work with the people in the shelter but the volunteers that are assigned to the shelter . living quarters are less than lex ourous. >> i didn't know i was going to sleep in a coffin. >> i will make the best of the where ever i am assigned. >> even if it is on a ship and this is the shelter they talk about for most of the life. >> we say let's go home and we are coming home here it is it like a hom
the n.y.u.-stern school of business, the columbia university of international public affairs and foreign university. welcome to all your students. we're glad you're here. and now it is my great pleasure to introduce our speaker, sir mervyn king. he is governor of the bank of england and chairman of its monetary policy committee and the financial policy committee. he served as the bank of england back to 1990 when he became a non-executive director. from there, he became chief economist and executive director and deputy governor. he was appointed governor in 2003. prior to his bank of england service, he taught at the london school of economics, harvard, mit, a cambridge, and the university of birmingham. he studied at king's college, cambridge and was a cannady scholar at harvard. hearingok forward to when you have to share with us today. the podium is yours. [applause] >> thank you and good afternoon. it is our real honor to be invited to speak to this great club of yours, especially in front of such a distinguished audience today. it is a pleasure to be introduced by roger because we w
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)